Hip and Pelvis Injuries

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Our hip specialists at the Nexus Clinic are highly skilled in the management of both traumatic and degenerative conditions of the hip, including carrying out fixation of fractures and total hip replacement for the treatment of fractures.

Our specialists use a combination of surgical strategies for the treatment of injuries and fractures around the hip.

These include single or combined approaches for fracture fixation and total hip replacement when required. When surgical procedures are necessary, we make sure patients at the Nexus Clinic can follow a personalised rehabilitation programme following their treatment in order to regain strength and flexibility as soon as possible.

HIP FRACTURES

A hip fracture occurs when the upper part of the femur (thigh bone) is broken. The femur forms the ‘ball’ of the ball and socket hip joint.

These fractures most commonly occur after a simple trip and fall in older patients, and after high-energy accidents such as falling from a bike at speed in younger patients.

Key Points — Diagnosis and Management

These points will be discussed in more detail when you meet your surgeon.

  • It is rare that surgery can be avoided. Surgery restores stability to the leg, allowing you to get out of bed and mobilise. This aids recovery and reduces the complications associated with bed rest. Surgical treatment of hip fractures is one of the major surgical advances of the 20th century.
  • Depending on where the break is, treatment may include fixing the fracture with screws and/or a large screw and plate to stabilise the bone. Some fractures heal poorly and are better treated with total hip replacement.

Key Points — Surgical Treatment

  • The Nexus surgeons have a huge experience in managing this problem, treating around 400 patients a year between them.
  • You will either have a general anaesthetic (you will be asleep) or a spinal anaesthetic (awake, but sedated). This decision will be made after you have spoken to your consultant anaesthetist.
  • This is a safe, reliable and effective operation for 90% of people.
  • Depending on your general health and support at home you will be away from home in a hospital or rehabilitation centre for somewhere between a few days and a few weeks.
PELVIS AND ACETABULUM (HIP SOCKET) FRACTURES

The hip is a ball and socket joint. The acetabulum is the socket part of the joint. The acetabulum forms part of the large bone of the pelvis and is surrounded by muscles that move the hip joint.

Fractures of the pelvis or acetabulum can be caused by a high fall, or more commonly a more severe injury such as a road traffic collision. In patients with weak bone (such as those with osteoporosis), the acetabulum can break after a fall from standing height.

Oxford is one of the few centres in the UK that specialise in this complex surgery. The Nexus surgeons work together to ensure you have the best surgery, by the best surgeon, in the best place.

Key Points — Diagnosis and Management

These points will be discussed in more detail when you meet your surgeon.

  • Treatment depends on the extent of the injury. If the bones remain well aligned surgery may not be needed.
  • It is unusual to be able to avoid surgery if the hip joint has lost alignment. Surgery will restore stability to the joint, allowing you to get out of bed and mobilise immediately afterwards, aiding recovery and reducing the complications associated with bed rest.
  • Surgical treatment of fractures of the acetabulum is one of the major surgical advances in the last 20 years. It is highly specialised surgery and sometimes requires more than one operation.
  • In some very complex fractures it is necessary to both fix the fractured pelvis and replace the hip. This highly specialist surgery will be discussed with you by your surgical team.

Key Points — Surgical Treatment

  • The Nexus surgeons have a huge experience in managing this problem, and are recognized experts in this field.
  • You will have a general anaesthetic for your surgery.
  • This is a safe, reliable and effective operation for 90% of people.
  • Due to the complexity of the surgery, and location of important structures close to the fractures, there are risks when you undergo this type of surgery. These will be discussed in detail with your surgeon.
  • Depending on your general health and support at home you will be away from home in a hospital or rehabilitation centre for somewhere between a few days and a few weeks.

REFERRALS & ENQUIRIES

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