Knee Injuries

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We have expertise in the diagnosis and management of all injuries to the knee joint and its surrounding structures.

This includes damage to the meniscus (load-sharing cartilage), the stabilising knee ligaments, associated tendons and fractures to the bones making up the knee joint.

The two most common knee injuries are to the meniscus or anterior cruciate ligament although injuries to collateral ligaments, patella tendon and fractures of the bones that make up the knee (femur, patella and tibia) are also treated. Whether elite athlete, amateur sports enthusiast or non-sportsman, getting the best outcome from your knee injury is our aim.

MENISCUS TEAR

Key Points — Diagnosis and Management

These points will be discussed in more detail when you meet your surgeon.

  • A torn meniscus can cause significant pain. This may be associated with swelling within the knee joint (effusion). There may also be mechanical symptoms of locking, catching or giving way.
  • Depending on the nature and extent of the tear, non-operative treatment with rest, painkillers and physiotherapy rehabilitation may be appropriate.
  • After more extensive tears, those with mechanical symptoms or those failing non-operative management may require surgical treatment to remove or repair the torn portion of meniscus

Key Points — Surgical Treatment

  • The surgery will be performed under a general or spinal anaesthetic.
  • This surgery is performed arthroscopically (keyhole surgery).
  • You are likely to require the assistance of crutches for a couple of weeks.
  • Return to heavy work or sports will depend on the exact surgery you have.
ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT (ACL) TEAR

Key Points — Diagnosis and Management

These points will be discussed in more detail when you meet your surgeon.

  • ACL injuries usually occur as a twisting injury during sporting activity. They occur whilst turning on a planted foot and most commonly occur in pivoting/contact sports such as football, rugby, basketball and netball. Skiing injuries to the knee in which the ski binding does not release is another common cause.
  • Isolated ACL rupture in a patient not partaking in regular pivoting sports can be successfully managed with non-operative treatment including appropriate rest, painkillers and expert physiotherapy rehabilitation.
  • In those wishing to return to regular pivoting sports or those with persistent instability symptoms, ACL reconstructive surgery may be appropriate.

Key Points — Surgical Treatment

  • The surgery will be performed under a general or spinal anaesthetic.
  • This surgery is performed arthroscopically (keyhole surgery).
  • You are likely to require the assistance of crutches for a couple of weeks.
  • You should be walking comfortably and confidently off crutches before driving. After ACL reconstruction, this is usually within 2 to 4 weeks.
  • Those working from home should be able to work within a week or 2 of surgery. Those with an office-based job need to be able to get comfortably to work via car or public transport and this is usually within 2 to 4 weeks. Those with heavier manual jobs will require longer.

REFERRALS & ENQUIRIES

Doctor, Physiotherapist or Patient; if you would like to know more about the services we provide or wish to make a patient referral or self-referral, please contact us via the relevant link below: